Taste and SmellDoes Your Sense of Smell Affect the Way You Perceive and Taste Flavors?Table of ContentsTable of Contents…………………………………………………………… Page 1Introduction…………………………………………………………………. Page 2 Materials and Procedure…………………………………………………….. Page Data Collected………………………………………………………………. PageResults……………………………………………………………………….. Page Conclusion…………………………………………………………………… Page Works Cited………………………………………………………………….. Page Introduction Have you ever smelled a food that tasted exactly like it smelled? Or tasted completely different than it’s scent? This is the science fair project designed to help you determine if your sense of smell really does affect the way you taste flavors or if it is all in your head. In this experiment, the senses of taste and smell were put up against four different jelly bean flavors: cherry, green apple, orange and lemon. By completing this experiment, it was learned if smell really does affect taste or if it is all a myth. The results from this experiment will make you blow your nose – I mean, mind! The five senses are some of the first things children learn when they are little. What they do not learn, however, is how the senses work with one another. Take taste and smell for example. Most people, when eating, take a whiff of the food that they are eating before putting it in their mouths. What they do not know, is that that whiff just changed the way that their brain perceived it. Research shows that about 90% of what people believe they taste, actually comes from smell. This essay will help to dig deeper into the specifics of taste and smell and their interactions with one another. Taste or gustation, is one of the five basic senses. To taste a food or object, the mouth is used. Located inside the mouth are many taste buds. These are responsible for transmitting the taste of the food to the brain. The taste buds can identify sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami (savory) tastes. Each different taste is caused by something unique that, in turn, makes the taste buds’ sensory cells react and send a special signal to the brain. Sweetness is usually activated by something sugary or by an item containing fructose or lactose. Amino acids are also activators of sweetness. Saltiness is triggered by foods that tend to contain table salt. The root of the salty taste is derived from a salt crystal, that contains the chemicals sodium, chloride, and even sometimes potassium and magnesium. Sourness, another type of taste, is kick-started by foods that incorporate acidic solutions. The sour taste comes from when the acid is diffused in a watery compound. Lastly, is the uncommonly known taste of umami, also known as savoriness. This type of taste is initiated by the taste of the following two amino acids, glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Just as taste is it’s own important mystery, smell plays an important role in the body as well.

x

Hi!
I'm Erica!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out