The ending of Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s Chronicle of a Death Foretold ends abruptly where the protagonist, Santiago Nasar, falls on his face in the kitchen of his own home, dead. There are still many untold details the reader may be wondering about that needs to be demystified, such as the real culprit for taking Angela Vicario’s virginity. In an attempt to satisfy most of the readers’ curiosity, the following diary of Angela Vicario, the dishonored bride, has been uncovered. What has never been said by Angela has been captured with her written words.

The whole mystery of Santiago Nasar’s murder will be solved and understood from Angela’s point of view and answers. Dear Diary, The news of the death of Santiago Nasar has reached the whole town. Different versions of the story of how the murderers finally got to him have been abridged, modified, and revised. Santiago was cornered and stabbed to death. Santiago walked around his house and even into townspeople’s house half alive and half dead. Santiago carried the remains of his body parts until finally he fell. Santiago let his death follow him. But it is only I, the bride-to-be of Bayardo San Roman, who knows the full story.

Out of all of the rumors and opinions about the downfall of the already acknowledged death, there was one that stood out most prominently: Santiago Nasar did not deserve to die. The whole town took into account that there must have been a reason why the entire city had prior knowledge of the carried out murder plan, yet Santiago was the last person to know about it. The innocent, well-known man has walked blindly into town without a clue of the ominous future. In order to redeem themselves, everyone in town has been put onto trial to reanalyze the fact that there was no possibility of saving Santiago from his unfortunate death.

Nonetheless, this will not be necessary because of my diary. Here, I prove the innocence of Santiago Nasar, and how the town could not stop the awful deed. I am the woman that brought all of the trouble in the first place. The shock of the murder has reached back to me; it had such a strong impact that I have finally decided to confess all of the secrets that started the problem in the first place here in written form. The truth is too enduring to be said aloud. First, I repent all of my sins, and I will be innocent from the murder. Instead, I will point my fingers at my brothers, the twins, and the blame should fall on both of them.

In the Hispanic culture, the virginity of a women is considered holy and of upmost respect. The man who gets to take the virginity away from the woman will be eternally bonded to her. I was not a true virgin at the time of the marriage with Santiago, and therefore caused an uproar which I admit. Yet, I have justification for my sin and it is up to the world and God to decide whether or not I will be repented for this act that could not be helped. Yes, I have been told that such a beautiful girl as myself can give in easily to the calling of cat-calls and wolf-whistles. But this was not the case for me.

I have more self-control and willpower than the average women and especially more constraint than that poor prostitute Maria Cervantes who has fallen in love with the deceased Santiago Nasar. On the other hand, I am not a woman of physical strength; I am weak and feeble. Defending myself from the harassment of another man will be useless since my protests and attempts to stop him will be ineffective. The damned man that I am talking about is Colonel Lazaro Aponte. Yes, the lazy Colonel who failed to prevent Santiago’s murder because he was “checking on his game of dominoes”.

The man who has authority around town, the man who has power and knowledge to vital information, is the man who goes by Lazaro Aponte. Many townspeople may be shocked by this rash accusation, but let me explain. It was Lazaro Aponte who has stolen my virginity and has never claimed it through the act of rape. My twin brothers found out later and became outraged, vowing to kill him and tear him to pieces. But because of his position as a Colonel of the town, he had access to every information possible because of the records of files he keeps.

Lazaro is a smart man: he had planned my rape very well because he knew I was the perfect victim. I was considered a beauty throughout the whole town yet not a lot of people know the history background of my brother Pedro Vicario except for Lazaro who did a bit of research. Pedro used to be in the army, and the reason why he quit was because of some “accidental” killing that he had committed. A bomb had exploded, killing several men in the war on Pedro’s side. With feelings of remorse, Pedro quit the war, but no one ever had known that it was him that caused such a tragedy.

It was with this information that Lazaro used to prevent the Vicario twins from killing him in redemption for me. Lazaro threatened that he would release this news of the accidental killings if he felt intimidated. It was the perfect blackmail: they could never accuse Lazaro for stealing my virginity. Everything quelled down after a while until Bayardo San Roman walked through town and proposes to me. My mother, Purismima, was ecstatic about the wonderful news and encouraged the marriage. This is where the controversy took place since Bayardo questioned my virginity after we had sex and there was no blood stain on our bed sheets.

Here is where Pablo Vicario decides to convince his brother that they need to confront Lorazo for my sake and for the sake of the marriage. However when Lorazo brought up the reminder that he had valuable information, Pedro broke down and refused to turn Lorazo in. Instead, the twins thought together and came up with the ingenious plan of putting the blame on Santiago Nasar since they still needed a name to point to for stealing my virginity. He was perfect since everyone knew that he liked sleeping with the local prostitute Maria, so sleeping with me would be so easy for him. Poor Santiago did not know what blame was put on him.

The whole town was not able to warn him in time because of fate. Such an innocent man does not need a warning for a crime he has committed, right? This is my explanation for things, along with Lorazo making every possibility of friends not to warn Santiago impossible. I hope the whole town now puts Lorazo Aponte on trial for his unjustifiable deed. There is no physical evidence of this, but it is the truth and evil that lays in his eyes that everyone should be able to see. Questions should rise such as why did he not try and warn Santiago Nasar about the Vicario twins, even though he is a Colonel. Was he just that “lazy”?

Please help satisfy my brother’s, Santiago’s, and my innocence through the conviction of Lorazo Aponte. And please let Bayardo San Roman accept my apologies: I should have let you know about my secret past. It was such an embarrassment that I could not help but to keep silent. Now that the truth is all revealed, let the town figure out the verdict of everyone in the town who was put in trial in the first place. Dear Diary, this is where I end my confession. Angela Vicario Works Cited Marquez, Gabriel Garcia. Trans. Gregory Rabassa. Chronicle of a Death Foretold. New York: Vintage International, 2003

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